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Twenty-one years ago, this web site posted a small item to honor the origins of Memorial Day. It has proved popular each year, and in an era where our attention is once again focused on protecting our nation, this note is presented in honor of those whose sacrifices we remember this weekend.

In 1876, Georgetown University adopted the colors blue and gray to honor its former students who had fought and perished in the Civil War. To this day, over 350 students and alumni have died in the service of their country, as well as faculty, chaplains, and Georgetown-trained members of the U.S. diplomatic corps.

Eight years earlier in 1868, not far from the University, a proclamation was read by Gen. John Logan, the commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, for a day of remembrance for those who had died on the battle fields. This proclamation is said to be the origin of Memorial Day.

This weekend, please take a brief moment to reflect on the sacrifices made by men and women from whose courage has helped ensure the countless blessings we now enjoy, and those blessings we seek to secure for the future:

"We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. All that the consecrated wealth and taste of the Nation can add to their adornment and security is but a fitting tribute to the memory of her slain defenders.

"Let no wanton foot tread rudely on such hallowed grounds. Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no vandalism of avarice or neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten, as a people, the cost of a free and undivided Republic."

 
 

Former coach John Thompson will publish an autobiography prior to his 80th birthday, reports the Washington Post.

Thompson, who has long maintained privacy on his life outside the basketball court, told the Post it was an opportunity for his grandchildren to learn his life story from a first person account.

In the early 1990's, Thompson turned down an opportunity by the late Ralph Wiley to author a book; in 2019, ESPN writer Jesse Washington is working with Thompson on the memoir, scheduled to be published in 2021.

"They can put a statue here of me and the building and all that crap," Thompson said. "People do and say very nice things, which they tend to do when you get older, which I'm flattered by. But I know, at times, I was an #$%^%$, too."

"In the middle of the night, Thompson often turns the most introspective," writes columnist Jerry Brewer. "When it happens, he grabs his phone, turns on the recorder and starts talking. Washington wakes up to see both long texts and recordings featuring that iconic voice."

"I primarily wanted to say, I'm 77 years old," Thompson said. "There are a lot of things that have been written or said about me that I would like to give my explanation of. It's not a question of I'm just trying to butcher somebody, or love them. I just want to say myself what I think I meant to do."

 

In 1819, just one Georgetown student received a degree at Commencement. Two hundred years later, three days of ceremonies welcomed nearly 3,000 men and women to the greater Georgetown alumni family, including Jessie Govan (C'19), Kaleb Johnson (B'19), and Greg Malinowski (C'19).

The three graduates were also joined by a paid of dual degree recipients: Trey Mourning (C'18, G'19), earning a fifth year master's degree, and staff member Jonathan Wallace (C'08, G'19), who earned a master's degree in executive leadership from the McDonough School of Business.

The basketball program has graduated 604 men since 1907, and since 1950 has graduated 92 percent of players overall, net of transfers.

 

After finishing last in the Big East in 2017 as a result of transfers and early entries, men's basketball moved up the list in its Academic Progress Rate score, which finished eighth in the Big East for this year's NCAA report.

The Academic Progress Rate, or APR, is a four year weighted average of each men's and women's sports team at NCAA member schools. A 1,000 score connotes a 100% graduation rate. The rate consists of one point for each eligible student-athlete and one point for each graduated student-athlete, an index that penalize schools with students that either are ineligible, or who leave school early.

Each player on a given roster earns a maximum of two points per term, one for being academically eligible and one for staying with the institution. A team's APR is the total points of a team's roster at a given time divided by the total points.

The APR for Georgetown men's basketball over the last ten years is as follows:

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Villanova 985 980 974 978 978 983 988 994 1000 1000 1000
Seton Hall 918 936 935 951 963 979 995 1000 1000 990 990
Butler 964 1000 1000 1000 1000 985 974 974 968 984 984
Providence 939 935 925 925 915 947 957 979 984 979 984
Creighton 961 956 960 975 971 972 991 986 981 971 971
Xavier 976 985 990 965 965 958 949 964 969 964 967
DePaul 940 987 1000 984 984 960 952 943 943 961 959
Georgetown 942 937 937 958 966 973 950 952 957 950 957
Marquette 970 975 980 970 960 959 949 962 966 950 955
St. John's 959 961 968 959 941 942 953 952 974 964 947
 

The Georgetown results among all sports are below (note that men's rowing and sailing are not included in that they are not recognized NCAA sports.) 

 
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Baseball 978 992 996 985 996 996 996 1000 996 992 988
Basketball (Men's) 942 937 937 958 966 973 950 952 957 950 957
Basketball (Women's) 975 982 983 1000 991 1000 995 981 986 986 990
Cross Country (Men's) 1000 1000 1000 1000 995 991 992 989 992 1000 996
Cross Country (Women's) 986 988 992 1000 1000 1000 1000 997 996 996 993
Field Hockey 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
Football 966 968 979 986 977 980 988 991 991 991 987
Golf (Men's) 1000 993 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
Golf (Women's) 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 991 1000 1000 1000 1000
Lacrosse (Men's) 982 987 991 967 990 984 982 988 984 984 992
Lacrosse (Women's) 989 994 996 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
Rowing (Women's) 1000 980 968 1000 990 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
Soccer (Men's) 991 977 966 988 971 983 990 993 993 996 1000
Soccer (Women's) 991 992 992 1000 997 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 994
Softball 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
Swimming (Men's) 1000 1000 1000 [x] 1000 [x] [x] 1000 1000 1000 1000
Swimming (Women's) 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
Tennis (Men's) 957 1000 1000 [x] 1000 [x] [x] 1000 1000 1000 1000
Tennis (Women's) 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 983 982 1000 1000 1000
Track (Men's Indoor) 1000 1000 1000 1000 996 992 992 989 992 1000 1000
Track (Women's Indoor) 989 992 997 1000 1000 1000 1000 984 994 997 995
Track (Men's Outdoor) 1000 1000 1000 1000 996 992 992 989 992 1000 996
Track (Women's Outdoor) 989 992 994 1000 1000 997 997 984 994 997 993
Volleyball 986 993 993 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
 [x]: Did not report; fewer than three student athletes in recruiting class.
 
 
 

New names continue to arrive online for the 2019-20 Georgetown roster, this time in 6-3 guard Chuma Azinge.

Azinge, a 6-3 guard from San Marino, CA who played a fifth year at Choate Rosemary Hall (CT), was an honorable mention selection in the New England Preparatory School Athletic Council (NEPSAC), which suggests that Azinge will be a walk on. Prior to Choate, Azinge was a second team all-city selection for San Marino, averaging 17 points per game as a senior in 2018.

Azinge's commitment would mark the seventh addition for the Hoyas next season, the most since the 1989-90 season.

 
 

Gene Smith Discusses 1984

Former men's basketball team captain Gene Smith speaks on the legacy of the 1983-84 team.

Final Statistics

The final numbers courtesy GUHoyas.com, where the 78.1 points allowed per game was the most since the 1971-72 season.

Harvard 71, Georgetown 68

For the first time in school history, Georgetown lost an NIT game on campus.

Hoyas Sign JC Forward

Galen Alexander announced via social media he will transfer to Georgetown for the 2019-20 season.

Strength Of Schedule

Georgetown's non-conference strength of schedule was 248th of 352 teams.

JT III On The Move?

John Thompson III is being considered for the jobs at St. Joseph's and Vanderbilt.

Seton Hall 73, Georgetown 57

The up and down Hoyas were decidedly down in the Big East Tournament.

Struggles On Defense

Allowing 30+ point scorers is now commonplace in the Ewing era.